Diary of a New-Bee

Honing in on what I really love to do has been a serious focus for over a year now. I dearly wish I had learned to do this earlier in life, but my theory is- I’m still young and better late than never. 
This “self-discovery” time has brought me closer to my writing, closer again to nature, closer to my relationships, and closer to understanding my emotions. 

Today I’m most excited about my newest discovery: Beekeeping a.k.a. Apiculture.


The random way in which this hobby came into my life was almost cosmic- a mention from my beloved father, a call to the bee community nearby, a purchase of a suit, and finally, the hook, a meeting attendance. And now I’ve got the fever. 

So, you might ask, what’s so great about beekeeping? Well I’m super fresh to the bee world, but to me it’s great for a few reasons. Most of all, I’ve spent my entire life knowing I want to help the world somehow but didn’t know exactly how to contribute. 

Recycling & composting, using organic and locally grown foods and products, shopping small, not putting straws in drinks (😁) are things I’ve done for awhile. At one job I even made cases against their styrofoam usage and non-recycling practices. None of this feels like enough though. It has been time for awhile that I found a real cause. A cause like beekeeping. 

If you’re unsure of why beekeeping helps the earth- you should know that bees are on the out, becoming extinct. Without the bees the world will have no food- or barely any. And it’s as simple as that. 

So what else makes beekeeping great? I would say that my favorite part about it is the support for the female involved in their culture. The strength given to females in the hive is truly fascinating to me. The bees have recognized the power of females to reproduce and harvest food and have devoted their lives to the protection of this female. While male bees are still somewhat important to reproduction, the difference here is evident. Strong nature super organism with a female lead, what’s not to like? 


The last and not least thing that got me going for bees was the local community. This was by far the most welcoming group I’ve begun in life thus far. They made it easy to fall in love. It was a huge group of instant family, feeding me honey and home grown goodies, showing me their bee children, and inviting me to help with their personal hives. 


Something to consider on these journies to understanding is that it starts with a basic fact about you. I came to an understanding that I need to help the earth to feel complete. Beekeeping feels like an answer to that need for now, with more to come in the future! 

Hugs and Backpacks,

BB. 

A Quick Stop in Georgia

We were on the first leg of our trip back home (FL->NY) and had accomplished about 6 of the 24 hour ride. We were in Georgia. It was midnight. It was raining. We were exhausted. We had no plans for sleeping. So we looked for campsites as we drove up 75.
The first.. and second.. and third.. were duds. Closed, unavailable, and closed again. We were about to set up camp in a Walmart parking lot when we went just a bit further and BAM! There it was. The perfect campsite – with a big neon open sign and lots of sleeping RVs. 

The Red Gate Campground was everything we needed at midnight. The office was “check yourself in” and pay in the morning. There was a nice bathroom with a shower. We also were directed by sign to camp in front of the office which was extremely convenient. 

The rain had picked up when we stepped out of the office. The air had a chill unknown to our Florida nights. Georgia is different. The tent was worth it.. even for this very moment. In 5 minutes we were parked, it was open, and we were in bed, listening to rain drops falling. It wasn’t long before sleep overcame us. 

At sunrise, we realized we had set up camp next to a cage with a rooster. He was letting off his “cock-a-doodle-doo!” every 3-5 minutes like an original snooze button. We accepted it for awhile before getting up, paying, and hitting the road. Not before having a look at the beautiful cock who woke us up though 😂. He was surrounded by chickens and baby rabbits in a lovely pen shaded by the branches of two huge southern oak trees. 

Just like that we were on the road again with a sunny day ahead. This was one of my favorite quick stops on the trip. The experience was really interesting. We learned a lot about finding a site, and about the ease of our magical tent. 

The biggest lesson here (and everywhere on a road trip) is to take a chance. Usually it works out.. and if not.. you’re still having fun! Life is good. 

Hugs and rooftents,

BB.